2015-2016 journal issue

These essays were submitted by students who took Arts One in 2015-2016 and selected to be published in this annual journal of Arts One student work, entitled ONE. Please see this page for more information about the journal.

 

graphic novelJournal 2015-2016novel
Image of David Mazzucchelli with a copy of graphic novel version of Paul Auster's novel, City of Glass

From Words to Images

June 1, 2016

On Auster’s City of Glass and Karasik & Mazzucchelli’s graphic novel adaptation

By Serena Huang

In Paul Karasik and David Mazzucchelli’s graphic novel retelling of the story, the plot, characters, and setting essentially remain the same as in the original text version, but the approach used to describe the protagonist, Quinn, and his attempts to solve a case differs noticeably due to the additional range of storytelling tools that the graphic novel provides. This essay examines the ways in which the graphic novel is either more effective or less effective in its message compared to the original text ….

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Journal 2015-2016novelpoetry
picture of gravestone (in the form of a cross) on a hill

Sylvia Plath: The Devil and The White Macaw

June 1, 2016

On Plath’s The Bell Jar

By Zorah Wiltzen

Esther’s enthrallment with Doreen’s life is comparable to her mourning of her father. Plath’s intense longing for her father’s presence in the poem “Daddy” therefore corresponds with Esther’s disconnect towards Doreen’s way of life in The Bell Jar. This comparison can be drawn from the symbolism of clothing adornments, physical appearances and telling actions.

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graphic novelJournal 2015-2016
image of Rorschach inkblot

Female Forces Behind the Mask

May 31, 2016

On Moore & Gibbons’ Watchmen

By Naomi Girard

Throughout the graphic novel, several women play influential roles in Rorschach’s life, each pushing him closer towards his crime fighter identity. By examining the ways that all these women drive Rorschach towards violence and his desire to claim a new identity, it becomes clear that his obsession with fighting crime is his way of grieving over and coming to terms with the injustice he experienced as a child.

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Journal 2015-2016novel
Picture of rail line in front of Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp

Sebald’s Barbaric Poetry

May 31, 2016

On Sebald’s Austerlitz

By Helen Zhou

“Nach Auschwitz ein Gedicht zu schreiben, ist barbarisch,” wrote Theodor Adorno. “To write poetry after Auschwitz is barbarism.” With all due respect to Sebald, I will argue that in Austerlitz, he both seemingly complies with Adorno whilst contradicting his arguments, one, by imitating the pillaging of free expression experienced by Jews during the Holocaust, and two, by attempting to represent the unrepresentable.

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FilmJournal 2015-2016philosophy
Woman with veil, photo by Erik Liljeroth, Nordisak Museet

A Smidge too Manly, A Smidge too Motherly

May 31, 2016

On Mulvey and on Hitchcock’s Vertigo

By Alexis Gervacio

Bespectacled, bold, and slightly boyish, Midge Wood does not easily fit into Mulvey’s analysis – she does not possess the “strong visual and erotic impact” characteristic of female characters (11). As such, this investigation will attempt to not only explain how Midge confounds the norm, but also why she is so different from the typical damsel-in-distress.

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Journal 2015-2016novelpoetry
Fresco of Sappho from Pompeii, dating from 55-79 CE

you burn me

May 31, 2016

On Faulkner and Sappho

By Graysen Currie

By placing As I Lay Dying beside Anne Carson’s translated work of Sappho, If Not, Winter, readers may come to find that Addie may not be truly dead, as vital pieces of her still remain. Many of Sappho’s fragments may even be read from the voice of Addie herself, even before her death. By taking a closer look particularly at Addie’s influence over her sons, the theme of travel, and at Addie’s desire for revenge against Anse, we may see that Addie’s influence is still potent, up until her body is put to rest in Jefferson’s soil.

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Journal 2015-2016novel
Picture of notebook, typewriter, book, glasses, pen

Convergence of Meaning

May 31, 2016

On Auster’s City of Glass

By Jake Clark

Paul Auster’s City of Glass is a text that confronts a wide array of themes, two of the most prominent being language and identity. Language is presented as the conveyor of meaning, connected to the Biblical myth of Babel, whereas meaning is an evasive concept that is tied to the genesis of language, but ultimately distanced from it by the same connection. The three implications of ‘private eye’ form the facets of Quinn’s identity, with the overpowering search for meaning uniting and eventually deconstructing his investigative persona and his core identity.

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FilmJournal 2015-2016philosophy
Woman looking through screen of 1's and 0's

Falling in Love with Siri

May 31, 2016

On Laura Mulvey and Spike Jonze’s film Her

By Grace Chang

Mulvey’s article, while intended to be a response to the films of Hollywood’s Classic Age of cinema (ca. 1930-1960), remains relevant. Hollywood remains a male dominated, dominatingly male, and heteronormative industry. However, a recent film, Spike Jonze’s Her, challenges Mulvey’s idea of physical pleasure and the gaze, seeking to break this erotic coding through the removal of the physical female form.

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FilmJournal 2015-2016philosophy
picture of a public telescope overlooking people at an old castle

Midge’s Point of View

May 30, 2016

On Mulvey and Hitchcock

By Ali Byers

In her argument Mulvey makes no mention of Midge, the film’s only other female character. Midge’s character complicates the idea that this is a purely symbolic film, and even attempts to subvert the codes that make up the symbolic. Both the way that Midge is captured by the camera, as well as how she is implemented in the plotline, complicate the simple dichotomies between man/woman, active/passive, and holder/object of the gaze that supports Mulvey’s argument.

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Journal 2015-2016misc non-fictionphilosophy
Mid-16th century drawing on silk of Zhuang Zhou dreaming of a butterfly

Sigmund Tzu and the Dream World

May 30, 2016

On Freud’s Dora and Chuang Tzu’s Zuangzhi

By John Wragg

When examining Freud’s usage of the dream world in his diagnoses, it is fascinating to see the similarities in which he approaches dreams and Chuang Tzu utilizes dreams, as Chuang Tzu is quite famous for his passage in the Zhuangzi, the butterfly dream. Despite a couple of millennia, and drastically different cultures separating the two men, their approach and philosophy regarding dreams as a tool to connect the dream and real world, a tool to discover of oneself, and as a tool to heal is extremely surprising in their similarity.

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graphic novelJournal 2015-2016
Picture of person with optometrist's machinery over their eyes

Eyes to Watch

May 30, 2016

On Moore & Gibbons, Watchmen

By Anne Wang

Eyes are everywhere in the comic series Watchmen by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons. From the eyes of every character to the pupil-like circles of clocks and “fallout shelter” signs, figures of vision can be found throughout. The very cover of the publication depicts a minimalist eye of the iconic happy face, expressionless and abstract, anonymous as a civilian, watched by the outside world and watching it back. The series plays on the reversible identities of the watched and the watchers.

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Journal 2015-2016philosophy
picture looking out a window through dark but still sheer curtains

The Souls of Black Folk and The Essentiality of Human Connection

May 30, 2016

On Du Bois’ The Souls of Black Folk

by Sierra Robbins

Du Bois’ classic text The Souls of Black Folk does not at first read as a cohesive argument. Rather, each chapter offers a different style, a different purpose, and this makes for a complex and at times disjointed reading experience. The unifying factor in the text is the metaphor of the “Veil” – a metaphor which itself varies according to the scope of each chapter.

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Journal 2015-2016misc non-fiction
Picture of Anne Frank in 1940

Anne Frank: The Young Girl and the Writer

May 30, 2016

by Tessa Mouzourakis

Instead of generalizing Anne’s self-awareness as a product of growing-up, her writing presents an image of division, as two versions of her character emerge throughout the novel. It is by reason of the small space the Annex provides and Anne’s own creative tendencies for self-reflection that her character separates between conflicting emotions and identities, that of optimism and realism; the young girl and the writer.

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Journal 2015-2016novel
Picture of a person on a moor that looks like a ghost in the fog

Where the Road Ends

May 30, 2016

On McCarthy’s The Road

Emily-Anne Mikos

The road keeps them moving forward, surviving the present and forgetting the past. However in sleep, away from the road’s security, dreams run rampant. Ghosts of dead loved ones, such as the man’s dead wife, exist in his dreams and bring the past to reality. Yet dreaming of the past can separate those who survive and those who die. Although presented as memory and nostalgia, the man’s dead wife is an omen of death that haunts his dreams and prevents him and his son from moving forward.

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Journal 2015-2016novel
Picture of old Rolleiform camera

The Person in the Picture

May 30, 2016

On Plath’s The Bell Jar

By Sophie McNeilly

When Esther poses for photographs and sees photographs of herself, the camera makes Esther a stranger to herself. Esther struggles to recognize who she is when confronted with images of herself. In this way, the camera reduces Esther from a self to an image, onto which other people project their understandings and expectations of her. Even in the mirror Esther does not recognize herself, a result of her internalization of the camera lens and the eye of the outsider that it represents.

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graphic novelJournal 2015-2016
picture of man in shadows in a street, smoking

Backstreets: Shadows, Violence and Queerness in Watchmen

May 25, 2016

By Rachael McDaniel

The queer characters of Watchmen visually inhabit either the world of shadows and secrecy or the world of demonstrative color, but the deeper in shadow the characters are, the more explicit, dangerous, and violent their queerness is. In this essay, I will consider Moore and Gibbons’ portrayals of queer characters, specifically the Silhouette and Rorschach, through their connection to shadows and darkness, and explore the public violence inherent in the shadowy space of queerness that they occupy.

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dramaJournal 2015-2016
picture of J. Robert Oppenheimer in 1946

Opposing Oppenheimers

May 18, 2016

On Kipphardt’s In the Matter of J. Robert Oppenheimer

By Jastej Luddu

Kipphardt’s play features many speeches and monologues concerning the accusations levied against Oppenheimer. These speeches also deal with larger thematic issues such as ideology, violence, and the purpose of science. The opening and closing speeches of the play, both spoken by Oppenheimer, illustrate the complex forces and motivations that influenced the physicist.

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Journal 2015-2016novel
picture of campfire

We Didn’t Start the Fire

May 18, 2016

on McCarthy’s The Road

By Emilie Kneifel

The father does not (or cannot) strictly follow the morality he teaches his son, as his decisions and actions are often borne of necessity. This willingness to compromise perfect morality for their survival means that the boy does not have to do so. Thus, the father’s tough decisions not only keep the two alive, but also keep the fire of old-world morality ablaze in the boy. They preserve the boy’s adherence to his strict moral code because he never has to compromise his beliefs.

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Journal 2015-2016philosophyshort story
Illustration of Bluebeard by Gustav Doré

Mulvey vs. Carter: The Power of the Gaze

May 18, 2016

By Vanessa Giesbrecht

Unlike Mulvey who makes sweeping general statements on how men act and react when with the opposite gender, Carter counteracts this by making her protagonists more complex with how they behave and react to different gazes. Although some of Mulvey’s concepts do fit with some of the situations presented in The Bloody Chamber, Mulvey’s concepts also prove to be oversimplified with how differently Carter’s female protagonists respond to their respective situations.

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Journal 2015-2016philosophy
Marx and Engels monument in Berlin

The Communist Manifesto and its earlier drafts

May 18, 2016

By Emily Dishart

The Manifesto was not written in just one sitting: Marx and Engels underwent a long process of editing in order to produce this short text. However, earlier versions allow the reader to grasp a more complete version of Marx and Engels’ ideas, although certain discrepancies are present, forcing the reader to probe the reasoning behind these variations. Engels’ “Principles of communism”, written shortly before The Communist Manifesto, may be seen, in several key aspects, as a more detailed and practical version of the later piece of work, clarifying certain aspects of communist thought ….

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Journal 2015-2016novel
Dome roof inside Antwerp Central Station

Voices Rolling in the Deep

May 18, 2016

On Sebald’s Austerlitz

By Elliott Cheung

Sebald creates a work of poetry that battles the barbarism of unintelligibility and gives the atrocities of the Holocaust a thoughtful and appropriate interpretation. Sebald infuses the fictional character of Austerlitz with an authentic and personal voice, conveying his story through an interweaving of words and images that, in their use of various literary devices, is highly poetic in form. In doing so, he rebukes Adorno’s pronouncement, using this poetry to revive the victims of Auschwitz from the unintelligibility and destruction brought on by both time and the Nazi oppressors that attempted to bury them.

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Journal 2015-2016novel
child looking through hole in a wall

“He’s Coming to Steal my Eyes”

May 17, 2016

On McCarthy’s The Road

By Daisy Couture

Vision is so important and omnipresent in the novel because of the multiple, essential functions it has. Sight is necessary for survival, especially in a post-apocalyptic world in which one’s sight is constantly being obscured by darkness. At the same time, vision is also intrinsically connecting, playing a huge part in relationships. Through the strength of sight, one can tie things to existence, both through memory and acceptance. As a force, vision is also linked to time, a way to direct focus to the past or the future.

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Journal 2015-2016philosophy
Detail from Frontispiece to Hobbes' Leviathan

From Bodies Politic to the Body Politic

May 17, 2016

On Hobbes’ Leviathan

By Cora Hermary

The Hobbesian state of nature both begins and ends with human nature. While Thomas Hobbes’ Leviathan is widely regarded as advocating a pessimistic view of human nature, Hobbes’ pessimism is not directed towards human nature, but towards the state of nature. Nevertheless, Hobbes tempers his pessimism for the state of nature with a subtle yet equal optimism for humanity, whose status as a creation under God guides his solution to the state of nature: art.

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Journal 2015-2016novel

Technicolour Ideals

May 17, 2016

On Plath’s The Bell Jar

By Claire Lloyd

Colour permeates Esther Greenwood’s narration in Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar. Esther often articulates her visual perception in vivid colour. She particularly emphasizes the aesthetic of a film she watches with the Ladies’ Day girls. The film is in technicolour; its colours are saturated. Esther is sickened by the film’s bright portrayal of disparate gender roles…. Plath shows that technicolour is psychological poison—its consumption results in a widespread sickness.

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Journal 2015-2016novel
picture of two women in party dresses from 1956, one whispering in the ear of the other

Forget the Juice Cleanse

May 11, 2016

On Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar

By Tati Chavitage

The ability to embrace femininity has always been a uphill battle in relation to the issues women have dealt with in Western society: in recent years, liberating ourselves through our sexuality has become apparent through movements like “SlutWalk”, a march that demands an end to rape culture, or even “free bleeding”, in which women refuse to hide their menstruation by allowing themselves to bleed without the help of tampons or other methods of concealment.

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Journal 2015-2016philosophy
Frantz Fanon, Wikimedia Commons, licensed CC BY-SA

The Decolonization Manifesto: Marx and Muslims

May 11, 2016

By Moneeza Badat

In The Wretched of the Earth, Frantz Fanon enhances a Marxist analysis by addressing the intersections of race, colonialism and capitalism. Fanon uses the terminology of Marx and Engels but applies it in different ways. By ‘stretching’ Marxist analysis, Fanon makes it relevant to decolonization (Fanon, 5). Though Marxism provides a competent analysis of capitalism, it does not fully address the intersections of race and colonialism.

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Journal 2015-2016poetry
William Blake, A Surinam Planter in his Morning Dress, public domain on Wikimedia Commons

Asserting Meaning in Dabydeen’s “Brown Skin Girl”

May 11, 2016

By Madeline Klintworth

David Dabydeen’s Slave Song addresses the dilemma of how to identify the ‘true’ voice of a Guayanese culture that has been clouded and corrupted historically by the voice of colonialism. Dabydeen, born in Guyana to Indian parents but having emigrated with his family to England as a young boy, expresses this conundrum in the three separate voices, all of them created by Dabydeen himself, that are intricately intertwined throughout the book ….

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Journal 2015-2016novel
abandoned building, from Pixabay

Dreams We Must Loathe

May 11, 2016

On Cormac McCarthy’s The Road

By Alexandra Cooper

As the Man attempts to walk the narrow line separating blind optimism and consuming despair, he uses his dreams and memories to keep him situated on the difficult path of realistic survival. The combination of the will to survive and unavoidable despondency yields a certain type of recollection of memory. In The Road, Cormac McCarthy uses the Man’s philosophy on dreams to follow the state of mind of his own characters.

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