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Crime and Punishment: Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?

Crime and Punishment: Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?

“God is dead.” So said Friedrich Nietzsche in 1882’s The Gay Science, but for some, God had been dead long before Nietzsche wrote His death into the public consciousness and put in His place stood a new breed of men, the Übermensch. Before Nietzsche, there was Fyodor Dostoevsky who, at the time of writing Crime and Punishment in 1866, set out to deconstruct this type of man who epitomized a distancing from the church, something the reformed clerical reactionary could not let succeed.

Rorschach’s Hypocrisy: The Moral Ambiguity of Watchmen’s Black and White Antihero

Rorschach’s Hypocrisy: The Moral Ambiguity of Watchmen’s Black and White Antihero

From the saturated pages of Watchmen emerges Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ antihero protagonist Rorschach, a stark representation of black and white against the vivid colouring of Watchmen’s setting and other characters. As the only character that does not adorn any bright colours, Rorschach appears to become Watchmen’s moral centre—the black and white amidst the chaotic colouring of his environment.

Herman Melville’s Typee and Margaret Cavendish’s The Blazing-World: A Comparison

Herman Melville’s Typee and Margaret Cavendish’s The Blazing-World: A Comparison

There are many similarities between Herman Melville’s 1846 novel Typee and Margaret Cavendish’s 1666 novel The Blazing-World. Both texts focus on an outsider who is given an intimate view of a society fundamentally different from their own. In Typee, a sailor named Tommo spends four months with the Typee, an Indigenous tribe on the South Pacific island of Nukuheva. Melville, through the character of Tommo, expresses his views on the European occupation and “civilization” of the Marquesas islands.

Outlawed but Not Alone: Friendships Out of Bounds in Grettir’s Saga

Outlawed but Not Alone: Friendships Out of Bounds in Grettir’s Saga

Icelandic Sagas all have in common the ubiquitous presence of friendships – among strangers, families, rulers, and members of a community. Two major currents of thought have aimed to explain the presence and function of these networks in Icelandic Sagas: friendship as a product of socially accepted morality, and friendship that exists to uphold Iceland’s legal and social infrastructure.