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Loving Her Was Red: The Dichotomy of Love and Desire According To Sappho and Taylor Swift

Loving Her Was Red: The Dichotomy of Love and Desire According To Sappho and Taylor Swift

Love is complicated, and the Greek poet Sappho knew this all too well. The lyrical beauty of Sappho’s poetry, and its intensely personal depiction of love and desire, led to acclaim from many of her contemporaries. In many ways, singer-songwriter Taylor Swift is Sappho’s modern analogue.

Destined Distance Between Melville, Tommo, and the Typee

Destined Distance Between Melville, Tommo, and the Typee

Typee: A Peep at Polynesian Life promises an account of Native life impartial to European bias: “the unvarnished truth” (Melville 2). Herman Melville, an American author, composes an exaggerated version of his own experience living amongst a group of islanders.

Atmospheric Prisons and Incomplete Epiphanies in The Matrix and Jane Austen’s Emma

Atmospheric Prisons and Incomplete Epiphanies in The Matrix and Jane Austen’s Emma

When sisters Lana and Lilly Wachowski wrote and directed the 1999 film, The Matrix, it was highly improbable they had Jane Austen’s novel Emma in mind. The Matrix takes place in a dystopian future where sentient machines have taken over all facets of society.

Heroes and Heroism in Moore and Gibbons’ Watchmen

Heroes and Heroism in Moore and Gibbons’ Watchmen

We wanted all of these very ordinary human beings, who sometimes speak sensibly, but most often don’t, who sometimes know what they’re doing, but most often don’t, to have a place in this vast organic mechanism we call the world. -Alan Moore, 1988

Austen’s Emma: Self-Knowledge and Growth

Austen’s Emma: Self-Knowledge and Growth

Satirically critiquing her characters’ behaviours and the English society in which they—and she—live, Jane Austen sketches a vivid portrait of her characters, their flaws, and the confines under which they operate in Emma. Austen’s Emma focuses chiefly on Emma’s blunders, imperfections, and progression; by letting go of her prideful notions and uncompromising supervision of the people around her, empathizing and identifying with them, and trusting their judgements of themselves, Emma learns that despite the unpredictable world around her, a change she can control is her own growth.

The Danger of the Unclassifiable Form:  Hybridity, Rulership, and Knowledge within Cavendish’s Blazing World

The Danger of the Unclassifiable Form: Hybridity, Rulership, and Knowledge within Cavendish’s Blazing World

Margaret Cavendish’s science-fiction novel The Description of a New World, Called the Blazing World can be read as evidence that a ruling class which places value on the perceivable world will struggle to remain in power. Cavendish’s Empress favours empiricism, and desires a complete understanding of the material world; however, the hybridity of her citizens and the immaterial world which she rejects are evidence of knowledge gaps within the Empress’s understanding.

The Restrictive Power of Schools and Streets in Ta-Nehisi Coates’s Between the World and Me

The Restrictive Power of Schools and Streets in Ta-Nehisi Coates’s Between the World and Me

In hopes of educating his teenage son on the everyday struggles black people experience, Ta-Nehisi Coates writes of his own personal life experiences in his memoir Between the World and Me. Presenting his revelatory experiences from childhood and adulthood, Coates struggles to understand how the destruction of black people is justified by the divide between the perceived races of black and white.

This World of My Devising: The Author as Authority and Other in Cavendish’s The Blazing World

This World of My Devising: The Author as Authority and Other in Cavendish’s The Blazing World

Cavendish’s The Blazing World is a vehement defence of fiction. In a preface “To the Reader”, she writes, “But Fictions are an issue of mans Fancy… without regard, whether the thing, he fancies, be really existent without his mind or not” (59). It grants the author a certain amount of leeway: under the guise of fancy, one need not be entirely factual, nor adhere so carefully to the rules of social propriety.

Verdure and Vermin: The Similarity and Superiority of Emma Woodhouse and Raskolnikov

Verdure and Vermin: The Similarity and Superiority of Emma Woodhouse and Raskolnikov

At first glance, Jane Austen’s Emma and Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s Crime and Punishment seem as different from one another as two novels can be. Their protagonists inhabit vastly different worlds and reckon with stakes orders of magnitude apart in their gravity; while Crime and Punishment’s Rodion Romanovich Raskolnikov trudges through the bleak and hopeless alleys of St. Petersburg, grappling with the mental and legal consequences of a double axe murder, Emma Woodhouse spends her days amongst the upper crust of Highbury, a quaint village in the British countryside, where backhanded insults are the most grievous harm one can inflict upon another.