2018-2019 journal issue

These essays and capstone papers were submitted by students who took Arts One in 2018-2019 and selected to be published in this annual journal of Arts One student work, entitled ONE. Please see this page for more information about the journal.

 

Though the essays are provided here for public reading, they are all still copyrighted to their respective authors (listed on each article) and may not be reused or reposted without express permission of those authors. Of course, paraphrasing or quoting from them with proper citation is encouraged!

 

capstone 2019Journal 2018-2019

Watchmen: Impediments, Failures, and Splits in Understanding

August 13, 2019

by Eric Davenport

In Watchmen, by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons, both Ozymandias and Rorschach think they have found the truth. Ozymandias finds truth in intellectual illumination, like the Gnostic “Eugnostos,” who “is all mind, thought and reflecting, considering, rationality and power” (“Eugnostos the Blessed”).

Launch
essay 2019Journal 2018-2019Uncategorized

The Past, Present, and Future in The Road

August 2, 2019

by Keeley Seale

The past can be a dangerous thing. Post-traumatic stress disorder, for instance, affects one’s future in innumerable ways, molding itself into fear and sadness, leaving one trapped at the bottom of the past’s well, the rope unreachable. In Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, the past plays a contrasting role to the role it plays in PTSD; the past is something to desire, something to strive for, something that awaits after death.

Launch
essay 2019Journal 2018-2019

In His Time: How Ernest Hemingway Defines and Promotes Masculinity in In Our Time.

August 2, 2019

by Henry Chung

In 1943, Ernest Hemingway wrote, “If you leave a woman, you ought to shoot her” (qtd. In Baker 554). This quote seemingly encapsulates Hemingway’s misogynistic attitude towards women, reinforcing his age-old image as a hyper-masculine, macho man. However, this culturally-ingrained conjecture does not accurately reflect Hemingway’s intentions in writing In Our Time.

Launch
essay 2019Journal 2018-2019

Liberty in Leviathan

August 2, 2019

by Chenyang Li

In Leviathan, Thomas Hobbes presents a world in which people make contracts with each other to create a sovereign, who has absolute authority over them and is responsible for their lives. This paper argues that although Hobbes advocates for authoritarian government, parts of his argument still tilt towards liberty.

Launch
Journal 2018-2019thematic survey 2019

Just Ideas? An analysis of the use of political authority to bring about justice in the world

August 2, 2019

by Benjamin Johnstone

While writers have long pondered what it means to lead a just life, some of the thinkers encountered in our course have argued for a preferred view of justice as a realizable ideal, and used arguments about political authority to bring this conception of justice into being. This essay will explore these uses of political authority beginning with the works of Sophocles, Plato, Hobbes, Hemingway, and Marx.

Launch
essay 2019Journal 2018-2019

Enlightenment for Dummies: The Simple Guide to ‘Finding Yourself’ by Friedrich Nietzsche

August 2, 2019

by Taylor McClement

“We are unknown to ourselves, we knowers: and for a good reason. We have never sought ourselves– how then should it happen that we find ourselves one day?” This is the very first idea presented by Friedrich Nietzsche in his collection of essays, On the Genealogy of Morality.

Launch
essay 2019Journal 2018-2019

The Bear, the Bird, and the Irishman: An Examination of the Loss of Innocence in “The Sound of Singing”

August 2, 2019

by Fisher Kliner

More than anything else, A Bird in the House is a story of entropy and change. Whether the theme of entropy is visible in Vanessa’s interactions with her elderly family members or in the entry and exiting of characters, it is most constant in Vanessa’s loss of innocence. Over the course of the stories, Vanessa is consistently alone in her naivety and innocence, surrounded by an adult world which confounds her…

Launch
capstone 2019Journal 2018-2019

The American Nightmare: Mohsin Hamid’s The Reluctant Fundamentalist and Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar

August 1, 2019

by Haylee Kopfensteiner

“I prevented myself as much as possible from making the obvious connection between the crumbling of the world around me and the impending destruction of my personal American dream” (Hamid 93). This is a quotation from Mohsin Hamid’s novel The Reluctant Fundamentalist, which tells the story of Changez, a young Pakistani man who goes to America for university and then stays for a job at a valuation firm.

Launch
capstone 2019Journal 2018-2019

Watchmen and The Odyssey on the Nature of Violence

August 1, 2019

by Carter Dungate

No one would deny that Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ Watchmen and Homer’s The Odyssey are vastly different works: with Watchmen being a graphic novel and The Odyssey being an epic poem composed nearly three thousand years ago, differences in genre and in historical or cultural context would be evident even without reading the works.

Launch
capstone 2019Journal 2018-2019

“A Lightning Burst of Knowingness”: What Chris Reveals About the Connor-MacLeod Family in A Bird in the House

July 31, 2019

by Paisley McKenzie

In Margaret Laurence’s collection of stories, A Bird in the House, the story “Horses of the Night” begins with Vanessa’s cousin Chris coming to stay at the Brick House while he attends high school in Manawaka. Unbeknownst to the reader as he first steps in the door, the story of Chris’ interaction with her family will become arguably the most useful of all the fictional memoirs of Vanessa’s life for tying together the themes that are present in the other stories.

Launch
capstone 2019Journal 2018-2019

Impression and Identity: How Margaret Laurence Reveals Character Through Observation and Reflection in A Bird in the House’s “The Mask of the Bear”

July 31, 2019

By Gabriel Dufour

First impressions do not fully comprehend identity. They can be effective tools to make basic judgments and broad assumptions; however, in terms of interpretation, their insights are extremely limited. A person’s physical and social traits contribute to these shallow representations of character, while their personal history and motivations are completely excluded from the analysis.

Launch
capstone 2019Journal 2018-2019

Understanding White

July 31, 2019

by Kyle Delgatty

A month ago I thought that I was white—that was until I read Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Between the World and Me. In his book, Coates doesn’t refer to people who look like me as ‘white’, but as “those Americans who believe that they are white”…

Launch
Journal 2018-2019thematic survey 2019

Alienation and Belonging in Authority and Resistance

July 31, 2019

by Nathan Willins

There are few things worse than feeling alone. Believing there is nobody to share life with, no group to which you belong, is a terrifying and crippling emptiness. This sense of isolation is often seen as a personal problem, a weakness caused and experienced individually.

Launch
essay 2019Journal 2018-2019

Love is Where Edges Meet

July 31, 2019

By Vladimir Chindea.

“The Promise” is a contract that tied the Hmong of Laos with the C.I.A. personnel during the Vietnam War. In exchange for this ethnic minority’s loyalty in the fight that the Americans led until 1975—and the resulting persecutions and mass migrations that followed their loss—it is still unclear what the imperial power guaranteed to them:

Launch