2019-2020 journal issue

These essays and capstone papers were submitted by students who took Arts One in 2019-2020 and selected to be published in this annual journal of Arts One student work, entitled ONE. Please see this page for more information about the journal.

 

Though the essays are provided here for public reading, they are all still copyrighted to their respective authors (listed on each article) and may not be reused or reposted without express permission of those authors. Of course, paraphrasing or quoting from them with proper citation is encouraged!

 

Journal 2019-2020

A Class of Their Own: Empowerment through literature in Coates’ Between the World and Me, Plath’s The Bell Jar, and Shelly’s Frankenstein

August 25, 2020

By Alexander Fardy

Education offers empowerment. To know more about the world, the people in it, and how they respond to the hardship around them is to prepare for life as an independent adult. It would seem, then, that an adolescent hoping to find their way in an openly hostile world could look to the opportunity afforded to them by traditional schooling with great enthusiasm, as they receive the knowledge that they will need to survive their oppression.

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Journal 2019-2020

Same Racists, Different Experiences: Comparing Race, Assimilation, and Identity through Literature

August 25, 2020

By Natalie Sparrow

In The Inconvenient Indian, Thomas King writes that “somebody once told me that racism hurts everyone. Perhaps in the broader sense of community, this is true. All I know is that it seems to hurt some much more than others” (King 185). This statement raises three challenging questions: What is race? What is racism? And can the effects of racism on an individual and their community be compared to another?

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Journal 2019-2020

Liberty Don’t Work as Good in Practice as it Does in Speech* (*Will Rogers)

August 25, 2020

By Noah Cohen-Vogel

I went on a road trip with a couple friends up the east coast of the United States this summer. One friend, who’s big into theater, played the soundtrack to Hamilton. This sparked the occasional political comment. “Say what you will about George Washington,” one companion remarked. “The most important thing he did was step down after two terms.”

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Journal 2019-2020

Not Simply Black and White: Whiteness as a Matter of Belief in Coates’ Between the World and Me

August 25, 2020

By Sophie Konrad

The scale, intensity and longevity of inequality is especially unique and unprecedented in America. This is because, as Ta-Nehisi Coates argues in Between the World and Me, American identity is essentially founded upon oppression, and thus economic inequality is anchored in racial inequality.

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Journal 2019-2020

Lucretius: The Risk and Rage of the Joys and Despairs of Love

August 25, 2020

By Maya Thulin

Sex, love, and relationships are compelling universal topics that have been the subject of countless musings and explorations. In his didactic poem, On the Nature of Things, Lucretius discusses all three, guided by his valuing of the Epicurean principle of pursuing pleasure and avoiding pain.

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Journal 2019-2020

Between a Rock and a Hard Place: How the Psychological Afflictions of Plath’s Esther Greenwood and Shakespeare’s Ophelia are products of binary worlds in The Bell Jar and Hamlet

August 25, 2020

By Joseph DelBigio

Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar and William Shakespeare’s Hamlet were written hundreds of years apart, but certain characters in the two works seem to have their lives controlled by similar conditions. Both Esther Greenwood in The Bell Jar and Ophelia in Hamlet live in worlds characterized by extreme political unrest and misogyny.

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Journal 2019-2020

The Karamazov Brothers and their Discontents: A Freudian Reading of Pain and Pleasure, Aggression and Confession in Dostoevsky’s Classic Novel

August 25, 2020

By Alexandra Lamb

While Sigmund Freud came to be known as one of the most (in)famous psychologists of all time, and while Fyodor Dostoevsky established himself as one of the great psychologists of world literature, some modern scientists might point out the close similarity between ‘Freud’ and ‘fraud,’ and no professor would assign The Double as required reading on schizophrenia. While one was primarily considered a psychologist, and the other primarily an author, the speculative features of both author’s writings have resulted in works that modern readers would recognize as resembling each other’s more than they resemble contemporary psychology.

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Journal 2019-2020

The Reflection

August 25, 2020

By Aiza Bragg

In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, the characters of Victor and his creature parallel each other as they both face injustice and suffering and both resort to violent revenge. The creature is a manifestation of Victor’s own flaws and motivations, as Victor calls him “my own spirit let loose from the grave […] forced to destroy all that was dear to me” (100), and he expresses Victor’s need for revenge, companionship, and power.

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Journal 2019-2020

I’m Talking to You: Mohsin Hamid’s The Reluctant Fundamentalist

August 25, 2020

By Manya Kapur

Since the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991, the United States of America has emerged as an unmatched superpower in the international arena. With its supremacy in the global economy and monopoly over mass media, the West stands at the forefront in shaping not only world culture and our accepted history, but the attitudes and ideals of the anglophone world.

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Journal 2019-2020

I am Not Your Stepping Stone: An Analysis of Ethnocentric Bias in Hamid’s The Reluctant Fundamentalist

August 25, 2020

By Emily Que

In a world shocked by the horror of death and calamity that came from 9/11, Mohsin Hamid allows us to listen to the voice of a Pakistani-American during this tumultuous time. While many novels about the terrorist attacks of September 11 occupy themselves in exploring the aftermath and traumatic effects on the white population, The Reluctant Fundamentalist’s story circulates around the critical stance of a Pakistani-American who momentarily fell victim to the powerful and imperialistic American system.

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Journal 2019-2020

A Faux Confession

August 25, 2020

By Ila Iverson

Mohsin Hamid’s casual yet powerful writing style communicates the biographical story of a Pakistani Muslim’s enchantment and disenchantment with America while maintaining a degree of uncertainty regarding the character and intention of the narrator and protagonist, Changez. The Reluctant Fundamentalistintrigues and involves the reader with unique stylistic decisions. Presented as a one-sided conversation, or as a monologue, the text brims with realism and ambiguity.

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Journal 2019-2020

“Thus Conscience Does Make Cowards of Us All:” Hamlet’s Freudian Sense of Guilt

August 22, 2020

By Macy Quigg

In Civilization and its Discontents, Sigmund Freud imagines the origin of guilt in humans and how it evolves into a more complex conscience. He posits that guilt stems from a fear of the loss of the father’s love when a child recognizes that they have done something bad and may be found out.

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Journal 2019-2020

A Return to the Sea

July 28, 2020

By Shan-Li Barkovich

Edna Pontellier’s story culminates in death, but not in destruction. The last pages of Kate Chopin’s novel The Awakening detail Edna’s final moment on the shore of Grand Isle in a position that may indicate her defeat as one who has attempted to break free from the conformities of what it means to be a woman in 19th-century America, but may also represent her success in accepting the impossibility of her situation and taking control of the one thing she has power over: her mortality.

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Journal 2019-2020

American Madmen: Oppenheimer, Teller, and the Purpose of Science

July 27, 2020

By Camryn Traa

When considering where to lay blame for the hypothetical end of the world, it can be hard to decide whether responsibility lies with the creators of the means of destruction or those who actively put these means to use. This struggle is present throughout Heinar Kipphardt’s play, In the Matter of J. Robert Oppenheimer.

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Journal 2019-2020

Eichmann, Oppenheimer, and the Perils of Blind Obedience

July 21, 2020

By Erfan Hakim

In Plato’s Republic, Thrasymachus makes the disconcerting claim that “justice is nothing other than the advantage of the stronger” (Plato 338c).What is fascinating about Arendt’s Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil is that Adolf Eichmann falls prey to Thrasymachus’ problematic conception of justice.

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Journal 2019-2020

Nietzsche and Arendt’s Warnings Against Totalitarianism

July 21, 2020

By Gabriel Cameron

Friedrich Nietzsche and Hannah Arendt have both been misinterpreted with regard to their attitude toward the Nazis, but in fact they both hold very strong and uncompromising anti-Nazi views. I believe Nazism is a version of the ascetic ideal, an ideal which Nietzsche abhors.

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Journal 2019-2020

What Does Justice Look Like for the “Banal” Adolf Eichmann?

July 8, 2020

By Nola Boasberg

Hannah Arendt’s Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil is nothing short of terrifying. The striking candor with which Arendt uses Adolf Eichmann’s 1961 trial to bring to light the horrors committed under the Third Reich is so irreconcilable with what we want to be true about the moral compass of mankind that it may be easier to pretend these events are all fiction, just an appalling thought experiment as to how far a society is able to go towards injustice and evil under the right circumstances.

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