2016-2017 journal issue

These essays were submitted by students who took Arts One in 2016-2017 and selected to be published in this annual journal of Arts One student work, entitled ONE. Please see this page for more information about the journal.

Though the essays are provided here for public reading, they are all still copyrighted to their respective authors (listed on each article) and may not be reused or reposted without express permission of those authors. Of course, paraphrasing or quoting from them with proper citation is encouraged!

 

Journal 2016-2017misc non-fiction 2017
close up of spider web with droplets of water on it

The Marriage of Science and Art in Carson’s Silent Spring

June 6, 2017

by Neshma Mattu

What struck me the most, after reading Silent Spring, was that it did not feel as if I noticed the notion of connectedness in an explicit way, but instead, I was convinced that it was inherent within her text. As a result of her literary style, it was not something that readers had to be reminded of so frequently, and this is because the idea is so deeply woven into her words.

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Journal 2016-2017short story 2017
Drawing of a woman with ornate gown being carried by monkeys dressed as humans

The Interchangeability of Gendered Traits

June 5, 2017

On Carter’s The Bloody Chamber

By Elizabeth Staudacher

Through exploring the relationship between sex and violence, Angela Carter presents the stereotypical masculine and feminine traits as interchangeable in her writing. By presenting different types of heterosexual relationships and roles, Carter legitimizes the desires of women and encourages them to pursue those desires, while deconstructing gender stereotypes.

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Journal 2016-2017novel 2017
Screen with horizontal lines on it, lots of bands of light and dark, and a hand and arm in front of it, silouetted against it

The Silence of God

June 5, 2017

On DeLillo’s White Noise

By Saakshi Patel

Death is the most prominent theme in Don DeLillo’s White Noise, manifested in the lives of Jack and Babette, primarily in the form of constant noise in the background. This continuous ‘white’ noise is representative of the couple’s constant thoughts about dying. All the important characters in the book contribute to this noise, with the exception of one – Wilder.

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Journal 2016-2017novel 2017
A building and lawn of Somerville College at Oxford University

Sayers’ Method of Understanding Academia

June 4, 2017

On Sayers’ Gaudy Night

by Mindy Gan

Within the context of Gaudy Night, the academic women’s failure to catch Annie is attributed to their steadfast intellectual stances and their feelings of bias, two seemingly antithetical states of mind. Gaudy Night proposes that in order to be a successful academic, it is necessary to maintain equilibrium between intellectual honor and human compassion within oneself.

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Journal 2016-2017novel 2017
white and gold mask with many white feathers on the side and top

The Feminist Façade

June 4, 2017

On Dorothy Sayers’ Gaudy Night

by Kelly Chan

Being able to take power over one’s inner demons is an essential aspect of feminism according to bell hooks in All About Love. All About Love, in turn, can be used to critique the extent to which Gaudy Night is a feminist novel, as hooks herself discusses the impacts the feminist movement has on these inner demons.

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Journal 2016-2017short story 2017
tiger from the side, just head and shoulders, looking like it's in a room with bars on the outside, light streaming in

Of Virginity and Violence

June 4, 2017

On Carter’s The Bloody Chamber

By Henrike Scholz

Carter combines the fairy tale, that most basic and innocent form of moral education, with pornography; material that also occupies the realm of fantasy, but for the antithetical purpose of eliciting erotic excitement. In doing so, she challenges the lessons about identity, gender and sexuality disseminated through both genres.

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drama 2017Journal 2016-2017
painting of a woman standing by a rocky shore with a broken ship on the water in the distance, during a storm

Marriage, Magic and Invisibility

June 4, 2017

On Shakespeare’s The Tempest

by Mabon Foo

The trio of Miranda, Caliban and Ariel, despite the differing individual relationships with Prospero, are relegated to positions of inferiority in part due to their connections with femininity. While both Miranda and Caliban are belittled in response to their uneasy symbolism with potential female power and authority, for Ariel, forced femininity is instead used to neutralize his potential threat.

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Journal 2016-2017novel 2017
image of brown dog staring straight at the camera, with a collar on that looks like a necklace of large green beads

“Hi non sunt homines”

May 30, 2017

On Wells’ The Island of Dr. Moreau

by Brandon Forys

To most, vivisection would certainly seem at odds with a humanizing process like personifying animals in our imagination. In the Island of Dr. Moreau, Wells portrays vivisection as a way to, in a sense, literally humanize animals, by physically and psychologically shaping them into humanoid forms through reshaping their bodies and conditioning them to follow laws.

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Journal 2016-2017poetry 2017
Blake's poem "The Chimney Sweeper" from Songs of Experience, along with the engraving of a boy chimney sweeper in the snow

A Heaven of Misery

May 30, 2017

On Blake’s Songs of Innocence and of Experience

by Caleb Verma

In both of his “The Chimney Sweeper” poems in Songs of Innocence and of Experience, Blake exposes the horror and corruption behind the culture that produces these young chimney sweeps, and delivers a critical commentary on how and why such atrocities and injustices are allowed to take place.

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Journal 2016-2017philosophy 2017
portrat of Niccolo Machiavelli from the shoulders up

Power to the People

May 30, 2017

On Machiavelli’s The Prince

by Kate Tandberg

Any discussion of The Prince inevitably runs into the problem of Machiavelli’s true intention and beliefs. The purpose of this essay is not to understand why The Prince was written, but to understand what the role of the People is within it, whatever Machiavelli’s personal conviction may have been.

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film 2017Journal 2016-2017
postcard with Dr. Caligari standing next to a coffin where his somnambulist Cesare is sitting, from the film

Looking for clothes but grasping at darkness

May 30, 2017

On Wiene’s The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari

by Aaron Zhuo

This essay will focus on the use of composition to demonstrate the way that Wiene ‘shows’ as opposed to ‘tells’ meaning. In particular, the essay will explore the effect of the iris shot, camera proxemics and negative space as compositional techniques to direct attention towards the characters and create meaning through a focus on emotion.

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Journal 2016-2017novel 2017
looking up through an elevator shaft towards the light

Where Black Men Tell White Lies and Silence Turns Loud

May 30, 2017

On Whitehead’s The Intuitionist

by Sophia Turunesh Mufuruki

As Colson Whitehead tells the story of Lila Mae’s life in the dystopian elevator world of The Intuitionist, he explores the complexities of racism and religion by illuminating the invisible grounds in which they are rooted. Whitehead makes real those things that the reader may think are not.

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Journal 2016-2017novel 2017
a window with spiderweb cracks of glass all over it, obscuring the view outside

Investigating the Death of the Author

May 30, 2017

On Paul Auster’s City of Glass

by Isaac Fairbairn

It should become apparent that the Barthesian murder of the author – as perpetrated by deconstructive criticism – is the central crime of this detective novel and in keeping with its formula, the reader and detective become jointly involved in a self-deconstructing journey which restores the natural order: of writer over language.

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Journal 2016-2017novel 2017
Cab Calloway holding up a sheet of music and singing

The Sound of Scandal

May 30, 2017

On Toni Morrison’s Jazz

by Eileen Chen

In parallel with the temptation-filled City, the motif of jazz alludes to the danger of indulging in desires, but simultaneously suggests that embracing and recognizing, rather than avoiding, that indulgence is what finally allows the possibility of reconciliation.

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film 2017Journal 2016-2017short story 2017
man holding camera lenses in front of each of his eyes so they look like his eyes

Guilty Women

May 29, 2017

On Angela Carter’s “The Bloody Chamber” and Laura Mulvey’s “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema”

by Lea Anderson

In her 1975 article, “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema,” feminist filmmaker and theorist Laura Mulvey analyzes how scopophilia imposes narrative roles upon female figures in mainstream cinema. But scopophilia is not limited to film; four years after Mulvey’s article was published, author Angela Carter released “The Bloody Chamber,” a short story driven by scopophilia and male fantasy.

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Journal 2016-2017philosophy 2017
Fresco painting of a man sitting and looking through a telescope pointed out a window while other men look on

Where did Plato and Galileo search for truth?

May 29, 2017

On Plato and Galileo

By Archie Stapleton

Galileo literally gazes at the sun until he is blind, while Plato looks into his mind at a metaphorical sun, revealing the primary distinction between them in their search for epistemic and metaphysical truth. For Plato and Galilei, in the realm of epistemology, the distinction between inward and outward is evident, while in the metaphysical arguments the lines are blurred beyond recognition.

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